2.04.2015

Seven Quick Links (2/4/15)

Ulysses

I am still reading it. And now I am reading things about it, too.

Carl Jung struggled with reading Ulysses, and I entirely identify with his frustration:

"As far as my glance reaches, there are in those seven hundred and thirty-five pages no obvious repetitions and not a single hallowed island where the long-suffering reader may come to rest. There is not a single place where he can seat himself, drunk with memories, and from which he can happily consider the stretch of the road he has covered, be it one hundred pages or even less… But no! The pitiless and uninterrupted stream rolls by, and its velocity or precipitation grows in the last forty pages till it sweeps away even the marks of punctuation. It thus gives cruelest expressions to that emptiness which is both breath taking and stifling, which is under such tension, or is so filled to bursting, as to grow unbearable." 

And delightfully, this week McSweeny's (re)published "Feedback From James Joyce's Submission of Ulysses to His Creative Writing Workshop." Hilarity! Two of my favorite quotes:

“Snotgreen” = hyphenated.
and 
Show us how these characters process memory, language, abstractions, and the urban landscape through stream of consciousness, don’t just tell us.

Heheheheheheheh.



Theopoetics

MY WORLD HAS CHANGED BECAUSE I NOW KNOW THEOPOETICS EXISTS. Sorry, that deserved some caps-lock.

Theopoetics: "an interdisciplinary field of study that combines elements of poetic analysis, process theology, narrative theology, and postmodern philosophy." THESE ARE ALL OF MY FAVORITE THINGS! I am wearing out my caps-lock here.

But really, seeing faith as like poetry as opposed to like science? That is exactly who I am and what I do.

Look, a primer on theopoetics! Look, a free-access paper on theopoetics! Look, a website devoted to theopoetics! I have found my people!

Someone cut off my exclamation marks; I am abusing them.

Whew.

Just Plain Fun


Adorable infographic on the unexpected origins of some familiar words.

And, from Book Riot, sage advice on how to stop that book from screaming. Because we all have had that problem, right?